First Impressions: Divinity Original Sin

First Impressions: Divinity Original Sin

One of the few games I’ve purchased in Early Access, Divinity: Original Sin has been fully released and I’ve jumped headlong into it co-op with my fiancé this past weekend. I wasn’t sure I’d enjoy it, as I played during Early Access and encountered a bunch of bugs, not to mention died within my first hour and had to restart because I hadn’t saved. However, after trying it out in full release and co-op, I’ve had a mostly positive experience that I wanted to share with you!

Graphically, the game is stunning for a top-down RPG, and character creation is diverse. Players can play either singleplayer, where they take control of both Source Hunters, or co-op with a friend in which each player controls one of the two characters. These characters can be customised down to the ground, including gender and appearance, voice, and starting skills. There is a class selection which doesn’t seem to be too binding as it only selects what equipment and skills you start with.

First Impressions: Divinity Original Sin

The environments are beautiful, and as I mentioned the game itself is aesthetically pleasing. This helps enhance the exploration aspect, since you will be spending a lot of your time looking in corners for interesting secrets, as well as searching for adventure in every corner of the map. Conversations can be found anywhere, and you often have to “argue” with your partner (or other character if you’re playing solo) or even NPCs, and this is done through a Rock/Paper/Scissors mechanic which was a pleasant surprise!

Combat is turn-based, which is fun because there’s more tactics involved than your standard RPG which seems to have gone in the direction of hack-and-slash. In Divinity: Original Sin, you have to consider where is the best place to stand in combat, what spells to use and when, when to run and when to attack. I have had to reload to the beginning of fights before because of poor decisions on my part!

First Impressions: Divinity Original Sin

I will say, however, that the combat can be frustrating due to packs of enemies having far too much crowd control, meaning everyone in your party may end up stunned, blinded or knocked down for long periods of time. This can make combat very difficult, but not in a way that feels is under your control. This is exacerbated by the fact that my fiancé took a talent called Lone Wolf, which means we can only have one companion rather than two. A full party of four (including two “companions” picked up throughout the story) might make this less of a problem, but frequently we find I’m stunned, he’s knocked down and on fire, and our mage is blinded, which makes the fight unnecessarily frustrating.

You do have to remember to quicksave often, and when I say often, I mean often! Just like most classic RPGs, you may make mistakes, or make decisions in conversations that impact your storyline that you might regret shortly after, so it’s useful to have a loading point. Luckily, quicksaving is as simple as pressing F5 at (pretty much) any time, so it’s not difficult to keep your progress safe!

We’ve already invested around 18 hours into the game, and that’s nothing compared to the 75 hours my friends and coworkers took to complete it, not including all sidequests. The game is vast, and I’ve found myself playing it for extended play sessions without even noticing. I recommend it to anyone who enjoys the classic RPGs like Baldur’s Gate or Neverwinter Nights, particularly if you have a friend or significant other you’ve been wanting to play a new game with!

First Impressions: Divinity Original Sin